what is multicultural marketing

Defining Multicultural Marketing

What is Multicultural Marketing?

what is multicultural marketing

In 2016, Latinos made up over 26% of the Silicon Valley’s population. This population is projected to rise to just over 1 million by 2050.

As diversity continues to increase in the United States, your target audiences’ culture must be incorporated into your overall marketing strategy to maximize your marketing campaigns’ effectiveness. Multicultural marketing encompasses the culture of your target audience including their language, traditions, customs, and beliefs. Your audiences’ culture tends to heavily influence their perception of your brand and products.

“Multicultural Marketing is more than just numbers and speaking the language. It is about speaking the culture which is defined by the people, their deeply rooted history, and reality.”

Culture is deeply rooted in our society and it shapes our daily lives. Multiple studies have proven culture matters in determining how people will perceive a specific message or advertisement. As marketers, we must keep in mind we are communicating with a group of people from all sorts of different cultural backgrounds. In other words, what makes sense in one culture, may not make sense in another. 

If you are a business in San Jose, CA or the greater Bay Area who would like to remain relevant in this growing, diverse market, your organization must form real connections with multicultural audiences. Multicultural Marketing is more than just numbers and speaking the language. It is about speaking the culture which is defined by the people, their deeply rooted history, and reality. It is the type of cultural context that you can fully appreciate from being a part of the community.

Kooltura’s Approach to Multicultural Marketing

At Kooltura Marketing, our goal is to help build community connection and cultural insight that is essential to multicultural marketing. As a strategy, we incorporate research studies, data, and our own cultural experiences while working closely in culturally rich communities.

If your organization or business is interested in reaching a specific ethnicity, culture, and/or subculture in San Jose, CA and the larger Bay Area, do not hesitate to contact us today. We offer marketing consulting, social media management and branding to individual artists, nonprofit organizations and businesses.

5 Christmas Traditions in Latino Households

Latinos’ love going all out when it comes to the holidays. This is especially true when it comes to the most wonderful time of the year! While the ways that Latinos’ celebrate the holidays vary from country to country and from household to household, one thing holds Celebrating Navidad is more than a religious holiday. Christmas is also about familia, friends, food, and culture. Keep on reading to learn more about typical Christmas traditions in Latino households.

5 Christmas Traditions in Latino Households

1. Posadas

Just before Navidad, many Latinos take part in a posada, a ritual re-enactment of Mary and Joseph’s search for lodging in Bethlehem. According to Hacienda Tres Rios, Mexican families hold a posada party in each of their homes from December 16th through December 24th.

posada San Jose ca

Posada Celebration at the School of Arts and Culture in San Jose, CA | Mercury News

The host serves as “innkeeper” while the guests sing a song and offer ponche caliente, buñuelos and tamales in exchange for shelter. Besides serving as a re-enactment of Mary and Joseph’s search, posadas also involve socializing, delicious food, and family fun including the rupturing of a star-shaped piñata filled with candy.

2.  Nochebuena

While most American families typically celebrate Christmas during the morning of Christmas Day, Latinos kick off the festivities on Christmas Eve, also known as Nochebuena (The Good Night).

Misa Del Gallo

Misa Del Gallo | 20 Minutos

The Huffington Post points out that although the night’s activities may vary from household to household, most Nochebuenas’ consist of family, large feasts, music, dancing, and gift-giving. If the families are Catholic, they may also attend a late Mass also known as Misa del Gallo (Rooster’s Mass).          

3. Night of the Radishes

The people of Oaxaca have their own unique way of celebrating Christmas. Because radishes are a staple to the Oaxacan culture, on December 23rd, artisans carve radishes to take on the elaborate shape of Jesus and other objects in the Nativity scene.

Oaxaca radish festival | © Anna Bruce/Culture Trip

Oaxaca radish festival | © Anna Bruce/Culture Trip

Oaxacans see this as a way of not only having fun but as a way of promoting local agriculture. During this unique festival, Oaxacans also celebrate Navidad through traditional food, music, and dance.

4. Tamaladas 

 No holiday is complete without tamales in a Latino household.

Tamalada / Image

Tamalada | 5280

Because tamales are a traditional staple in Latino households, families and neighbors gather around during the holidays to participate in tamaladas, or tamal making partiesMaking tamales can be a time-consuming task. As a result,  participants bond while sharing their own tamal recipies and prepare this yummy “must-have” in bulk.

5. Parrandas

 In Puerto Rican Households, parrandas are common during the holiday season. According to the Huffington Post, a parranda is a tradition in which friends, family members, or even strangers, visit each other’s homes spontaneously and overtake them with holiday merriment.

Parranda | Pinterest

They do so while playing instruments such as maracas, guitars, and tambourines. While others dance along to the music, others sing and fill homes with their contagious holiday spirit. Besides singing and dancing, Puerto Ricans also take the time to socialize and consume traditional food and drinks such as rum.

While Christmas traditions in Latino households may vary from household to household. They all undoubtedly involve tasty food and good times with families and friends. What are your favorite Christmas traditions?

Kooltura’s Approach to Multicultural Marketing

At Kooltura Marketing, our goal is to help build community connection and cultural insight that is essential to multicultural marketing. As a strategy, we incorporate research studies, data, and our own cultural experiences while working closely in culturally rich communities.

If your organization or business is interested in reaching a specific ethnicity, culture, or subculture in San Jose, CA and the broader Bay Area, do not hesitate to contact us today. We offer marketing consulting, social media management and branding services.

 

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Thanksgiving, an All American Holiday?

Thanksgiving originated as an all-American tradition, but over time, different cultures residing in the United States have incorporated their own unique traditions into the holiday.

The Thanksgiving Traditions that are Shared Among Other Cultures:

The once, all American holiday is typically celebrated with a central theme in mind– autumn. Like Americans, many different cultures living in the United States decorate their homes to reflect the fall. Inspired by autumn color palettes, popular decorations include autumn wreaths, pumpkins, candles, and flowers that showcase the new season. 

Latino American Thanksgiving Traditions

As mentioned, there are some similarities that exist between a Latino American Thanksgiving and an All American Thanksgiving. But, Latinos tend to celebrate the holiday by adding their own flavorful and spicy dishes into the holiday.

When we think of the typical Thanksgiving, we usually imagine a dinner consisting of turkey, mashed potatoes, and gravy. However, in Latino American households, the food list goes on and on!

While many Latino Americans choose to have the traditional Thanksgiving turkey dinner, many others chose to opt for tamales, mole, pupusas, or marinated roast pork featuring bold flavors and authentic ingredients. Champurrado, ponche caliente, and delicious flan tend to be a part of the festivities as well.

flan

Flan Source: Px

Besides differing in their menu selections, most Latino Americans feature loud and lively music to celebrate the holiday. Because Latinos are strongly family oriented, their Thanksgivings may also involve abuelito telling stories about his childhood and the children playing together in the sala.  

Indigenous “Thanks Taking” Traditions

In San Jose, CA, Calpulli Tonalehqueh, Akoma Arts, New Fire/Yancuic Xihuitl, and others join in solidarity with the International Indian Treaty Council, to commemorate all indigenous cultures and traditions in a sunrise gathering. They unite Native, Mexica and African drums to honor the heartbeat of Mother Earth.

This Sunrise Gathering originated as Un-Thanksgiving Day to honor the indigenous peoples of the Americas and to promote their rights. It coincides with a similar protest, the National Day of Mourning, held in Massachusetts.

Annual SJ Thanks Taking Sunrise Ceremony Source: Caluplli Tonalehqueh

The event is designed to commemorate the survival of Native American peoples following the settlement of Europeans in the Western Hemisphere, which led to enormous losses among Indians from disease, warfare, and social disruption. Organizers want it to serve as a contrast to the traditional Thanksgiving story in which the Pilgrims peacefully shared a meal with Native Americans.

Vietnamese American Thanksgiving Traditions

After immigrating to the United States, many Vietnamese have become fond of Thanksgiving festivities as well. Charles Lam, a Vietnamese American from Asian Weekly mentions, “Because my parents were born and raised in Vietnam, you could say that my “regular” Thanksgiving has always been a little … skewed.”

He mentions that his family has always made sure to make Thanksgiving special. Even when his dad had to work at night, he and his family would have a “Thanksgiving lunch” in lieu of the traditional Thanksgiving Dinner.

He remembers that when his family first celebrated the holiday, their dinner consisted of roasted duck, pork, Vietnamese baguettes, and Vietnamese spread.

Vietnamese Baguettes Source: Hungry Forever

Lam admits that even though his family has become more adapted to American traditions, as their dinner now features turkey and mashed potatoes, it is still a Vietnamese dinner. He mentions, “We still eat baguette over rolls, there’s still no sprig of rosemary anywhere in my house, and that beef roast is marinated with soy sauce, fish sauce, and lemongrass. That stuffing? It’s made up of glass noodles, boiled quail eggs, and baby corn. It’s still a Vietnamese Thanksgiving meal.”

 

Portuguese American Thanksgiving Traditions

Portuguese Thanksgiving Stuffing Source: Portuguese Diner

Many Portuguese Americans have also chosen to embrace the once, All American tradition of Thanksgiving by bringing their own Thanksgiving traditions into the mix. Like Americans, they may feast on a delicious dinner featuring turkey. However, many Portuguese Americans add their own special flair to it by incorporating their Portuguese stuffing into it. Check out this awesome Portuguese Thanksgiving stuffing recipe here.

While other cultures would typically not serve seafood during their Thanksgiving, according to the Sun Sentinel, some Portuguese families do. Rodeiro, a Portuguese American who was interviewed by the Sun mentions, “It’s hard to bring our own culture into something we don’t have. So the only thing we can do is bring the food”.

While Portuguese Americans are at the table, they alternate between English and Portuguese as they feast. Thus, incorporating their culture into the holiday.

Kooltura’s Approach to Multicultural Marketing

At Kooltura Marketing, our goal is to help build community connection and cultural insight that is essential to multicultural marketing. As a strategy, we incorporate research studies, data, and our own cultural experiences while working closely in culturally rich communities.

If your organization or business is interested in reaching a specific ethnicity, culture, and/or subculture in San Jose, CA and the larger Bay Area, do not hesitate to contact us today. We offer marketing consulting, social media management and branding.

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Make Music Day – San Jose, CA

We are honored to be one of the approved graphic design vendors for the City of San José, CA. In the past, we have worked with various departments within the city including the San José Office of Cultural Affairs, the Office of Economic Development and the Environmental Services Department.

Celebrated internationally, Make MusicDay is a free, outdoor day of music held on the summer solstice. San José joined the celebration for the first time in 2017 with performances taking place citywide from sunrise to sunset.

Launched in 1982 in France as the Fête de la Musique, Make Music Day is now held on the same day in more than 800 cities in 120 countries.

Completely different from a typical music festival, Make Music is open to anyone who wants to take part. Every kind of musician — young and old, amateur and professional, of every musical persuasion — pours onto streets, parks, plazas, and porches to share their music with friends, neighbors, and strangers. All of it is free and open to the public.

For the second year in a row, we have had the pleasure of creating the graphics for San Jose, CA’s Make Music Day. Take a look at the graphics we created for this lovely event!

If you are interested in learning more about this event, click here.

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At first glance, Halloween and Día de Los Muertos (Day of the Dead) can easily resemble one another. Both involve skeletons, costumes, death, spooky stories, and sweets. Though similar, the two holidays possess striking differences in traditions and tone.

Halloween: A Night of Darkness and Terror

The ancient origins of Halloween demonstrate it is a celebration based on dead invisible spirits or demons. The holiday is often associated with evil, the devil, fear, and violence. Tom Sanguinet, a former high priest in the Celtic tradition of Wicca (witchcraft), mentioned, “Halloween is purely and absolutely evil.”

The spooky holiday originates from Ireland, the United Kingdom, and northern France from the Celtic Festival of Samhain. The festival was held in honor of Samhain, lord of death and haunting spirits. The day it was celebrated on marked the end of summer and the beginning of the cold, dark winter time which was also associated with death.

Over time, Pope Gregory III implemented All Saints Day on November 1 in honor of all saints. All Saints Day incorporated some of the predominant themes and traditions of the Celtic Festivals. Therefore, the evening before this new holiday became known as All Hallows Eve which is now known as Halloween.

As new immigrants started immigrating to the United States, mostly due to the Irish Potato Famine, they began to popularize the celebration of Halloween throughout the nation. Over time, people incorporated new activities to celebrate this holiday including trick-or-treating, jack-o-lanterns, spooky stories and costumes. Overall, both Halloween and Día de Los Muertos’ were inspired by a central theme- death. However, they both attribute a different meaning to the word.

Día de Los Muertos: Colorful Festivities and Celebrations

Día de Los Muertos pays respect to those who passed, but it does not dwell on death. The goal of the holiday is to honor and demonstrate love and respect to those who have passed away. It is not a time of mourning. Instead, it is a celebration of life, ancestors, culture, and the meaning behind our own lives here on earth.

Why the Heavy Use of Skeletons Then?

Skeletons are a predominant symbol for Halloween and Día de Los Muertos. But the meaning behind skeletons in México is very different in comparison to the United States. In México, the skeleton signifies the dead playfully mimicking those who are living and not a macabre symbol at all.

How is Día De Los Muertos is Celebrated in México?

During Día de Los Muertos festivities, most Mexicans honor their ancestors who have passed away by visiting their graves. Relatives have a celebration consisting of food, drink, and prayer as if the deceased was in their presence. The people of México also create elaborate, colorful altars also known as “ofrendas” in their homes. These altars are decorated with beautiful marigold flowers (cempazuchitl), papel picado, candles, incense, decorated sugar skulls, and items the person enjoyed during their time on earth as a tribute to their loved ones.

Loved ones decorate the altars with photographs of the deceased. Altars are also decorated with the loved one’s favorite food and items relating to their occupation while on earth. For example, if they were a construction worker, they would take a hammer and nails to leave on their grave. If they were a shoemaker, they would take tools the deceased used to create shoes. The way this holiday is celebrated throughout México varies. While some states in México go all out on Día de Los Muertos, other states might not.

How is Day of the Dead Celebrated Locally in the United States?

Festivities are also held in honor of those who have passed in the United States. While celebrations can differ throughout the nation, they are often loud, colorful and festive. Processions are held in which people dressed as skeletons parade through the city while banging drums for Aztec dancers as burning incense fills the air. Mariachi music is also played throughout the procession as community members dress up in colorful costumes and vibrant masks to honor their muertitos.

Festivities in the United States also feature traditional food and drink such as tacos, agua de horchata and churros. This year, La Ultima Parada in San José, CA will honor the Mexican tradition of the Day of the Dead through a collection of cultural festivities, vibrant dances, and musical performances.

La Ultima Parada: A Celebration of Life on the Day of the Dead

To kick off La Ultima Parada on Saturday, October 27, the Alum Rock Altar Walk (6 p.m.) will feature altars and other art installations at 30 locations in the three business blocks surrounding the Mexican Heritage Plaza (MHP) in San Joséé, CA.

Following the altar walk, the Cumbia Dance Party (8 p.m.) at the School of Arts and Culture at the Mexican Heritage Plaza will feature music group La Clandestina. This event is FREE.

On Sunday, 12pm-8pm, La Ultima Parada will feature a variety of epic music, vibrant dances, and fun activities to delight the entire family. La Ultima Parada 2018 will feature a Mercadito with over two dozen Día de Los Muertos themed retailers as well as a wide variety of delicious food and beverages. This event is $10 for adults and FREE for children under 10.

Do not miss out on celebrating Día De Los Muertos this year. Purchase your tickets now via Eventbrite!

Cumbia Dance Party

Cumbia Dance Party at La Avenida de Altares 2017

Kooltura’s Approach to Multicultural Marketing

At Kooltura Marketing, our goal is to help build community connection and cultural insight that is essential to multicultural marketing. As a strategy, we incorporate research studies, data, and our own cultural experiences while working closely in culturally rich communities.

If your organization or business is interested in reaching a specific ethnicity, culture, and/or subculture in San Jose, CA and the larger Bay Area, do not hesitate to contact us today. We offer marketing consulting, social media management and branding.